How Can I Eat Like A Local In Brazil? (part 3)

Drinking as well as eating in Brazil are regarded as many fantastic socializing activities since these are necessities. Foods such as beans and rice are Brazilian staples aside from being consumed just about daily. The food routine daily includes three primary meals other than snacks in between. Here, lunch and dinner are considered as the socializing time. It is also the time for relaxing as well as appreciating wholesome dishes.

Afternoon

For a refreshing snack, particularly in the summer, you should not ignore acai with banana or granola.

Evening

During the week, this meal tends to become one family event with people in the family eating together. Else, they at least savor dishes at the same time. You know, the family’s teenagers may like taking their food to appreciate in their rooms. Dinner often has beans and rice and is served with stroganoff, meat, pizza, or lasagna. It is one wholesome meal enjoyed around 8 p.m. or 7 p.m. and will be the day’s last meal.

Sometimes, Brazilians will dine out to enjoy joyous hours after work as the beverages are on promotion, often until 9 p.m or 8 p.m. It is often the time for colleagues at work to socialize outside of their office hours, destress following a tense day, or to savor a chilled drink in the hot weather. One of the most popular beverages to have during their happy hour is indeed not caipirinha that is more popular among tourists, but one chopp (it is cold beer served in one small glass). Else, it is 600-milliliter bottle beers that are served amongst the group. While drinking, Brazilians will often snack on something – for example, empadas, pastels, or a portion to get shared – for instance, dried meat, apim, salami, fried chicken strips, or croquettes.

How Can I Eat Like A Local In Brazil? (part 2)

Afternoon

People tend to eat rice, beans, fish, or meat and a selection of vegetables and salads. Lunch is followed by a straightforward dessert like pudim (like a flan) as well as almost always by one shot of espresso with a lot of sugar. Plus, it is common to have a specific shot of caipirinha before beginning lunch, just to increase their appetite.

Business lunches are considered a significant part of building client relationships. These ones are often far longer than one hour without any time pressure as well as with the intent of creating one friendly and relaxed environment. Commonly, an important meeting takes place at 10:30 a.m. or so., followed by one business lunch. A popular place to have one business lunch is at one churrascaria (i.e., Brazilian steakhouse with all-you-can-eat things) where the waiters serve a couple of cuts of meat on skewers other than the diverse and extensive salad bar. At lunch, people òten chat informally about life, football, travel, and culture; business comes later.

Some eating etiquettes are present in Brazil. At the dinner or lunch table, it is polite to wait until others have been served before beginning to eat. Food like bread should be eaten with one napkin — Brazilians do not usually touch food with their hands. Also, when a fork and knife cannot do the job, they use a napkin instead. Smoking at the table while enjoying food is one big no-no.

Brazilians often snack later in the day at around 3 p.m. as well as again at 6 p.m. on their way home from work. Some of the typical snacks are packets of milk biscuits and cereal bars. Other popular snacks should be salgadinhos that are savory pastries as well as pieces of bread like cheese slices of bread.