Estrada Real in Minas Gerais: one of the most favorite road trips in Brazil

The Estrada Real (or Royal Road) is a historic routes series in Brazil. It spans the states of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Minas Gerais. These roads (a total of 1,600km in length) was built in the 17th/18th centuries by the Portuguese colonists.

They were used to transport diamonds, gold, and other minerals in the hinterland of Minas Gerais to the Atlantic coast’s ports such as Rio de Janeiro, as well as to Portugal. The Minas gold rush, having brought much wealth to Portugal and financing the Industrial Revolution in England, led to towns along the roads with the construction of mansions, ornate government buildings, and elaborate baroque churches.

These days, the Estrada Real is the only way for visitors to explore the lush nature and rich cultural and historical legacy in this part of the country.

  • Quality: Unpaved but generally well-maintained.
  • When to drive: Accessible all months of year.
  • Accommodation / Camping: All towns have guesthouses and lots of rough camping opportunities.

The Estrada Real runs from Diamantina, about 250 kms north of Belo Horizonte, then splits into two roads: one ends in Rio de Janeiro and the other continues to Paraty in São Paulo. The road has much natural beauty and meanders mainly through the state of Minas Gerais. You can find great places for rough camping at the rich historical heritage in some exquisite colonial towns.

If you don’t have much time, you might want to focus on the central part of the road, from Ouro Preto to Caxambu, with a lot of picturesque towns and dozens of rococo and baroque churches. One of the best-known town is the UNESCO World Heritage Site Ouro Preto.

Paraty and Diamantina are really more than worth a visit so don’t mind driving those additional kilometers. You should visit Diamantina on a Saturday evening from May to October to attend a big-band concert taking place with the musicians playing from the balconies around the plaza.

What The World Can Learn From Brazil About Living Well (part 4)

7. Decent variety is a lifestyle 

Brazil has the second biggest dark population – dark being characterized by individuals of African descent in the manner that we would describe them in this nation. It’s second just to Nigeria. In any case, nobody knows this.

Indigenous, Portuguese, Italian, Nigerian, German, Korean, and Japanese ancestry is mostly typical, making Brazilians a genuinely extraordinary blend. 

In any case, since it is a blend, doesn’t mean it isn’t likewise a mosaic that respects particular traditions and cultures: In Salvador da Bahia, the biggest city in the Northeast locale, Yoruba culture of the nineteenth century is so all around protected (because of the city’s dismal history as a center of the worldwide slave exchange) that researchers of Nigerian history and culture visit the community to learn. 

8. All.day with Cafezinho

In the event that you’ve lived or worked in Brazil, you realize that time can be estimated in the modest, coffee measured cups of cafezinho, a sweet, solid shot of coffee that is devoured by businesspeople as well as students. Altogether, Brazilians drink a normal of 5.8 kg of coffee each individual, every year, which may help improve heart wellbeing, forestall diabetes and a few cancers and even fight off stress

9. They’re chipping away at the inequality issue 

Verifiably, the significant separation between poor people and the rich has been a wellspring of bad health, an absence of mobility, and injustice. In any case, that is starting to change. Salary disparity is dropping at a pace of 2.2 per cent every year, as reported. Also, the poverty rate drops 7.9 per cent every year – up to three times the speed set by the Millennium Development Goals task force of UN. Furthermore, educational attainment is increasing, because of a 60 per cent expansion out in the public spending on the secondary schools.

What The World Can Learn From Brazil About Living Well (part 3)

5. They juiced before juicing became a big thing

Here’s the key [to eating cheap]: the city’s freewheeling, quick-moving corner juice bars, where countermen take your request and seem to shout it – “orange with papaya, no sugar!” – into a mass of guavas, apples and mangoes. A moment or two later, a glass shows up from an opening in the wall, loaded up with super cold, foamy, heavenly squeeze. 

Without a doubt, these bars offer fried lanches and a few desserts, however, the nutritious juices, smoothies and natural product servings of mixed greens are the focal attractions. That has a great deal to do with Brazil’s natural abundance: Between the Amazon’s extraordinary biodiversity and the fertile farmland of a significant part of the nation’s inside, the quantity of supplement thick natural products indigenous to Brazil are unmatched. 

The outcome? Natural, fresh, local and nutritious food is likewise probably the least expensive and most promptly accessible. 

6. Architectural beauty

You could pardon Brazilians for being happy with the beauty of nature that encompasses them – with the views such as the one from the highest point of Corcovado, Iguazu Falls and Itaquai River in the Amazon. Indeed, even the more hackneyed waterfront vistas resemble this

Yet, that hasn’t halted a rich architecture tradition, most promoted by the celebrated Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer, who is liable for the absolute most beautiful buildings in the nation – aside from the whole building plan for Brasilia

Curves are the quintessence of his work since they are Brazil’s essence, pure and straightforward – according to Niemeyer, who shared about his structural style. He said he was a Brazilian before he was an architect. He could not separate the two.

7. Decent variety is a lifestyle 

The ethnic and racial blend that is Brazil has driven Henry Louis Gates Jr. to call the nation the second blackest country on the planet.