What The World Can Learn From Brazil About Living Well (part 3)

5. They juiced before juicing became a big thing

Here’s the key [to eating cheap]: the city’s freewheeling, quick-moving corner juice bars, where countermen take your request and seem to shout it – “orange with papaya, no sugar!” – into a mass of guavas, apples and mangoes. A moment or two later, a glass shows up from an opening in the wall, loaded up with super cold, foamy, heavenly squeeze. 

Without a doubt, these bars offer fried lanches and a few desserts, however, the nutritious juices, smoothies and natural product servings of mixed greens are the focal attractions. That has a great deal to do with Brazil’s natural abundance: Between the Amazon’s extraordinary biodiversity and the fertile farmland of a significant part of the nation’s inside, the quantity of supplement thick natural products indigenous to Brazil are unmatched. 

The outcome? Natural, fresh, local and nutritious food is likewise probably the least expensive and most promptly accessible. 

6. Architectural beauty

You could pardon Brazilians for being happy with the beauty of nature that encompasses them – with the views such as the one from the highest point of Corcovado, Iguazu Falls and Itaquai River in the Amazon. Indeed, even the more hackneyed waterfront vistas resemble this

Yet, that hasn’t halted a rich architecture tradition, most promoted by the celebrated Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer, who is liable for the absolute most beautiful buildings in the nation – aside from the whole building plan for Brasilia

Curves are the quintessence of his work since they are Brazil’s essence, pure and straightforward – according to Niemeyer, who shared about his structural style. He said he was a Brazilian before he was an architect. He could not separate the two.

7. Decent variety is a lifestyle 

The ethnic and racial blend that is Brazil has driven Henry Louis Gates Jr. to call the nation the second blackest country on the planet.